the colours and the words

I love the nook in the hardware store
Where the colours of paint present themselves on cards
I am traversing the world and all time
Creating universes in my mind
In glancing from caption to caption

“the ballet” picks me up and spins me
soft pink ballet shoes
bobby pins in tight buns
long, lean muscles of
strength&grace

“oceanfront” dunks me in it’s cool blue
Brings me to a place where I was losing and finding love
and a small island off the coast of North Carolina

“day at the jewellers”
I smile at the silver anklet jingling above my heal
And skirt the glance of the head waggling Indian young man
Flirting with me from behind the counter

“limoncello” makes me thirsty
And long to read a novel and go to Italy
As does “gelato in the park”

But then, I wonder, am I ever not wanting
To go to Italy?
And when am I not thirsty?
And when am I not
Thrilled by colours
And wooed by words
And wanting to burst forth into the world
Just as flowers burst forth through the earth?
And when am I not deeply desiring the Union of all beauty?
And the presence of all that is pure and holy?
And the creation of all that is scintillating and good?
And when am I not awaiting a rebirth of wonder
In the eyes of those around me?
And when am I not racing to find
Blue oceans and ballets?
And when am I not
Hoping against hope
For the sweetness of poetry
To both capture the world and transform it
Like prophesy?

When am I not awed
and left breathless
at every colour
and every word?

Dear followers, Thanks so much:)

Dear followers,

Wow. There’s fifty-two of you!

And I’d like to thank every one of you for following. I’m very humbled that you all appreciate my poetry and such enough to follow along. I hope you’ll kick back and stay awhile. I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments. And I look forward to seeing more of your as I visit your sites:)

May your love be filled with love and poetry and mandarine oranges.

❤ Ariel

The Man Who Saw the Moon

“I saw the moon!” said the man with the long grey beard. (And since he had a long grey beard we know, of course, that he was a reliable witness)

“I saw the moon!” said the man, and he rushed down from his high mountain. He ran down past the evergreens and their rich and biting fragrance. He ran down past the long and elegant waterfall cascading down the great stone bluffs marbled with clay and greenery. He ran down past the large, grey, slippery stones majestically piled alongside the mountain path. He ran down and down and down till he reached the tents, and there in the dim light of the cooking fire the man with the long grey beard (and since he had a long grey beard we know, of course, that he was a reliable witness) said to his eldest son. “I saw the moon!”

“You saw the moon!” said the eldest son and ran to his wife who was hunched over the fire cooking paneer. “He saw the moon!”

“He saw the moon!” said the eldest son’s wife and up she got from the cooking pot, and ran to second eldest son’s wife who was just now coming with the pitcher of water. “He saw the moon!”

“He saw the moon!” Said the second son’s wife, and grabbing the shoulder of her toddling daughter said “Go and tell your father! He saw the moon!”

“He saw the moon!” said the daughter for her mother to father who was (as we know) the second son of the man with the long grey beard (And since he had that beard we know, of course, that he was a reliable witness). And the second son stopped making rope for the ponies out of goat hair, and went out to the field where his youngest brother was tending to a goat who had broken its leg (along with the youngest brother’s eldest son) “He saw the moon!”

“He saw the moon!” said the youngest brother, and turning to his eldest son said “Tell your mother!”

And so the son of the youngest brother ran to his mother who was slapping dough between her hands to make the roti, and said to her (rather out of breath from running up the mountain) “He saw the moon!”

“He saw the moon!” said boy’s mother (who is, as we know, the wife of the youngest brother) “He saw the moon! Run and tell my family.” So the boy got on a pony and rode it swiftly down the mountain into the valley to the family of his mother. And the boy told his mother’s brother, who told his mother’s sister in law, who told his mother’s mother, who told his mother’s father (who also had a grey beard, and since he had a grey beard we know, of course that he was a reliable witness too) who traveled to the mosque and went to the committee who were staring through a small window with a pair of binoculars, and said “He saw the moon!”

“He saw the moon!” said the committee (who all had grey beards, which means, as we all know that they are all reliable witnesses) and the committee told everybody in the mountains and the valley. And that was the beginning of Ramazan.